Rock climber organizing climbing gear with Pelican Go Case.

The Pelican Go Case an Adventurer’s Essential

I’m a gear junkie no doubt. I like how gear assists in making life easier, or your job more enjoyable. I never really got caught up in the “everyday carry” (EDC) fad. However, we all have some kind of EDC. Like me, you probably never leave home without your keys, ID/credit card, your phone and a few miscellanies items. Now I keep them all safely organized in my Pelican Go Case.

The thing is, if you’re outside and braving the elements more often than you’re braving the shopping districts, chances are you might need a better way to organize and protect your everyday essentials.

Since Pelican’s newest addition to their “personal utility cases” this year, I’ve had the opportunity to put these new Go Cases to the ultimate test. If the Pelican GO Cases can survive my rigorous lifestyle of seemingly endless travel, and adventures outside big and small… they can survive anything.

Pelican Go Case on rock outside.
Samsung S8+ With Pelican Protector Case organized with my EDC essentials protected by the G40 Go Case.

Go Case Features.

The Pelican Go Cases are totally water-proof, dust-proof, crush-proof, outdoor photographer-proof. You would expect nothing less from Pelican. There’s a small rubber bumper around the cases that helps take hard falls. A loop to clip a ‘biner through which you can then attach to a harness, backpack, or hang up on your key holder at home.

Here’s some more features listed on Pelican’s website.

  • Lifetime Guarantee
  • Rubberized protective bumpers, protects against drops
  • Built in pressure Valve – Keeps water and dust out while balancing air pressure
  • IP67 rated protection from water, dirt, snow & dust
  • Integrated single hinge latch
  • Abrasion and impact proof ABS outer shell
  • Handle for easy carry
  • IP67 rating = Waterproof to a depth of 1 meter for 30 minutes
Backpacker wearing Pelican GO Case on pack.
Scoping out some potential climbing routes with the G40 Go Case clipped to my pack through the case loop.

Go Case In the field.

I’ve taken had the Pelican G40 personal utility Go Case protecting my EDC and valuables all over the place. Earlier this year I camped out with it while documenting a 7-day ultra stage race in the mountains of New Zealand. I used it to keep my personal items organized and protected from the harsh weather that New Zealand is famously known for.

On small adventures closer to home I’ve clipped the Go Case to my backpack and hiked all around our province without having to worry about the welfare of my belongings on my pack or at camp. Rain or shine, I know my personals are safe from whatever weather or mini disaster I might run into.

The true test has been taking it to the rocky and treacherous crag where we spend our days rock climbing. My G40 Go Case has taken a few falls at the crag from poorly executed tosses, and unexpected tumbles with my valuables inside… no worse for ware.

Pelican Go Case on rock next to rock climbing shoes.
G40 Go Case beside size 42 or US 10 climbing shoes for scale.

Applications are limitless.

I can definitely see the Pelican Go Cases largely benefiting anyone who works or plays on the water. I haven’t had a chance to spend much time out on the many lakes near home yet this year (It’s still early spring here in Ontario), but I’m sure the Go Case will also be an essential on any portaging, or canoe/kayak access camping.

The applications are as limitless as the contents you’ll want to store inside it. My EDC typically includes my phone, license, keys, credit card, charging cable, and spare batteries and SD cards.

Do you have your EDC sussed out? If so, what does it include and how do you protect it on your adventures?

Photos by Hailey Playfair and Ryan Richardson at Life Outside Sudio.

Written by Ryan Richardson

Helping Businesses Create Original Marketing Content That Effectively Engages Targeted Audiences.

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